Nov 11, 2012; Philadelphia, PA, USA; Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones (center) talks with COO/EVP Stephen Jones (left) and EVP Jerry Jones, Jr. (right) prior to playing the Philadelphia Eagles at Lincoln Financial Field. The Cowboys defeated the Eagles 38-23. Mandatory Credit: Howard Smith-USA TODAY Sports

Dallas Cowboy’s GM Admits He Doesn’t Know the Roster

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June 11, 2013; Irving, TX, USA; Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones talks during a press conference after minicamp at Dallas Cowboys Headquarters. Mandatory Credit: Matthew Emmons-USA TODAY Sports

In an off-guarded and extremely disturbing admission the Dallas Cowboy’s General Manager had this to say according to DallasCowboys.com,

Don’t give me a quiz. Really, I don’t know the entire roster on the defensive line. The no-name group, we’re talking about the defensive line.”

Said the owner and GENERAL FREAKING MANAGER, Jerry Jones.

Excuse me? You mean to tell me the General Manager doesn’t know every player on the team? The person who is supposed to know everything about everyone? The person solely responsible for player personnel is laughingly admitting he doesn’t know his roster?

What other professional sports organization would tolerate this kind of ignorance from its GM? Jerry himself wouldn’t tolerate this from one of his employees, why would he accept it from himself?

The problem with the Dallas Cowboys is this right here. The structure of the front office is absurd. If the owner is also the general manger then how can anyone be held accountable for poor personnel moves?

If there is no accountability then what is the great motivator in making intelligent fact-based decisions?

You see, in the real world, the one you and I live in, we are paid to make decisions. Depending on your specific occupation you will see varying degrees of importance on your decisions. If you repeatedly make poor decisions you know you will be fired. You don’t necessarily operate out of fear but you know consequences exist and risk must be weighed in your actions.

The consequence is an important element in the decision making process. Without a consequence you and I would take considerably more risks. We wouldn’t think things through as long. Simply put, we wouldn’t be very good at our jobs.

Sep 22, 2013; Arlington, TX, USA; Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones talks with son executive vice president Stephen Jones during halftime against the St. Louis Rams at AT

Many of us know Jerry’s son, Stephen, is taking a bigger role in personnel than even Jerry himself. Jerry, despite holding the GM title, really has Stephen doing most of the leg work. But does that change anything? It’s pretty safe to say Stephen holds a considerable amount of job security. He’s the boss’s son for goodness sakes. Just like Jerry, Stephen has no accountability for his poor decisions. It’s the same issues and the same broken structure.

In victory Jerry mistakenly admitted how broken this system really is. Kinda a downer topic coming off a big division win, huh? Sorry about that. But I blame Jerry.

 

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Tags: Dallas Cowboys Jerry Jones Stephen Jones

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