Dallas Cowboys: 5 major gambles that will determine their season

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Tim Heitman-USA TODAY Sports

They say if you’re pessimistic then you’ll either be right or pleasantly surprised. The Dallas Cowboys were rewarded with plenty of pessimism this off season after a massive let down in the playoffs, followed by a number of departures from quality players like Amari Cooper, Randy Gregory and La’el Collins. After that came a quiet free agency period and a draft that leaves hope, but still underwhelmed plenty of people.

This puts the Dallas Cowboys in an all too familiar situation where they have to count on the stars aligning, which only happens for one team each season and that team tends to also do themselves good fortune by adding talent in any way they reasonably can.

The Dallas Cowboys are making a concerning number of gambles this season

Something the Dallas Cowboys lean on more than most contending teams in the NFL are rookies and the luck factor. Everyone relies on young players and every team which makes a Super Bowl run gets there with a little luck. But the Dallas Cowboys bank a little too much on both.

We are going to look at 5 “what if” factors that could determine the Dallas Cowboys 2022 season. We’ll look at both sides and conclude what the most likely outcome will be for the ‘boys in each scenario. First, let me give you a better idea of what we’ll be discussing.

Take the 2014 season, for instance. The Dallas Cowboys defensive roster was not pretty, especially after losing Sean Lee.

But what if Rolando McClain actually plays well? What if a guy like Jeremy Mincey can have one of his best years? And the “what if” for literally every single team to ever play a full season, what if they can be one of the healthier teams in the league?

Despite the Sean Lee absence, the 2014 Dallas Cowboys had all of that go their way. McClain was a monster. Mincey brought great pressure. Tyron Crawford, Tony Romo, Tyron Smith, all the guys you usually worry about stayed relatively healthy.

Now that you have an idea of what we are talking about, let’s get started!

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